How ADHD Impacts Time in A Classroom

clock and calendar - ADHD time management

Students diagnosed with ADHD can sometimes struggle in a traditional classroom setting. Completing assignments from start to finish, especially on topics that don’t come naturally, can seem impossible for a student with ADHD. This neurological condition can affect a person’s perception of time, making some classes feel like they last an eternity, and others seem to fly by before being able to absorb the material.

Being Seen As “Disruptive”

Often, students with ADHD who also have trouble controlling impulsivity, blurt out their thoughts. Depending on the way the classroom is run, teachers and fellow students can find this disruptive. Help your child understand that his or her thoughts and opinions are important, but that they should show respect to their teacher and classmates by getting in the habit of raising their hand if they have a comment or question.

Trouble Completing Assignments

One of the symptoms of ADHD is having trouble paying attention. When a student starts an assignment, they can easily get distracted before completing the task. Sometimes, they go down a completely different avenue than what was assigned because they found something else more intellectually stimulating. A strategy to combat this is through sequence activities. This involves breaking up one long assignment into multiple, shorter assignments that, in the end, can be put back together into one assignment. This is something that a student can do themselves in the classroom if they feel overwhelmed by a project.

Being Helpful

While parents can’t be there in the classroom with their child, there are ways to be supportive at home. Take note of things your son or daughter brings up about their day. For example, if they frequently mention noticing what’s going on outside the classroom window, maybe a seat change would be helpful.

Read more on ADHD management from Sage Day.